Woodworking Techniques and Advice

Post-processor software provides the final kick

When starting in the digital fabrication world, there are many pieces — both hardware and software — that are obvious. Eventually you’ll discover other sophisticated technology that affects performance.



The intricate science behind CNC tooling

john_englishJohn Parsons was born in Detroit in 1913. Thanks to Henry Ford and others like him, that was a good place to grow up if you wanted to be an inventor. After two world wars and an economic depression, Parsons was working at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio during the late 1940s. He and his assistant, Frank Stulen, were designing propeller blades for helicopters when Parsons conceived the notion of using nascent computer technology to control the path of a cutter.



The CNC purchase is mere prologue

Introducing a CNC router to a woodworking business is more than just buying the machine and putting it in the shop. Like all management or market-driven changes to an existing business that introduces a new technology, there needs to be planning beyond the financial arrangements.



The sound in a cut never lies

A good ear can help with a CNC router’s performance, but only after careful consideration is given to tooling selection, and feed and speed rates



Getting past the spin when it comes to spindles

The last piece of non-consumable hardware of a three-axis CNC router is the spindle. Many woodworkers already own a spindle, though they know it as a router.



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