Woodworking Stories, Woodworker Profiles and Products

Balancing act

Written by Jennifer Hicks Monday, 17 June 2013 00:00

balancing1With a mix of vintage machines and dedicated setups, New England Joinery Works in Essex, Conn., can quickly produce custom millwork, doors, windows, flooring and more in its spacious 12,000-sq.ft. shop. Curved millwork is the shop’s specialty, which is often made from PVC products.

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Carrying the torch

Written by Ann Goebel Monday, 17 June 2013 00:00

torch1Lodged at the end of Lumber Street in Salisbury, N.C., is a classic brick-and-mortar structure with varnished hardwood floors because that’s the way they built lumber mills a century ago. Home to Goodman Millwork Inc., it still stands as a sturdy, steadfast symbol of a family-owned enterprise that has survived every up and down, from the Great Depression to the recent Great Recession.

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Helping out where it counts

Written by Jennifer Hicks Monday, 17 June 2013 00:00

helping2As many cabinetmakers know from experience, there are several advantages to outsourcing standard cabinetry components. Take, for example, Max Hunter’s prospective that woodworking component suppliers bring a wealth of knowledge to their product. The former woodworker is now CEO and president of Western Dovetail in Vallego, Calif. Established in 1993, the company is celebrating its 20th anniversary and has seen significant growth, particularly during the last three years.

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Don’t fear the dead zone

Written by John English Monday, 20 May 2013 00:00

deadzoneleadInside corners are the bane of kitchen designers everywhere. What’s the best way to handle this awkward zone? Should one always try to use every cubic inch of available space? Or is there an easier solution?

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A slice of the Big Apple

Written by Jennifer Hicks Monday, 20 May 2013 00:00

manhattanSince it was established in 1976, New York’s Manhattan Cabinetry has been designing and producing custom furniture and cabinetry for high-end clients, primarily in the borough that shares the company name. It’s a big operation, with about 40 employees, and was even bigger in the past when 70 workers were needed to meet the demands of a flourishing economy.

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