Woodworking Stories, Woodworker Profiles and Products

Comfort zone

Written by John English Monday, 13 February 2012 00:00

35_featureThe setup of a workshop has a big impact on the quality and quantity of the work produced in it. Everything that goes into making a shop easy to operate is covered by a branch of behavioral science called ergonomics, which OSHA defines as “the science of fitting workplace conditions and job demands to the capabilities of the working population.” The goal of ergonomics in a professional woodshop is high productivity, avoidance of illness and injury risks and increased worker satisfaction.

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An entirely new tilt

Written by Charlie Self Monday, 13 February 2012 00:00

40_featureWoodworkers around the country have felt the pinch of the current and long-lasting economic downturn. Michael Maxwell, a native of Bedford, Va., has been a high-end furniture maker for a long time now, but he’s had to make some changes to stay ahead of the slower sales pace. Fortunately, he’s had a good fallback position, based on one of his many hobbies.

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Inspiration is all around them

Written by Jennifer Hicks Monday, 16 January 2012 00:00

35_features_1Scott and Stephanie Shangraw are a husband-and-wife woodworking team. They create handcrafted custom furniture, as well as carved vessels and other sculptures for high-end clients throughout the country.

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Rising in Phoenix

Written by Jennifer Hicks Monday, 16 January 2012 00:00

26_feature_1Handcrafted Cabinet and Furniture Co. is a custom woodworking operation based in Phoenix that was started in 1984 by Steve Mosley. With the help of eight employees, the shop designs and produces freestanding furniture, doors, millwork, residential and commercial cabinetry and more.

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In the eye of the beholder

Written by David Getts Monday, 16 January 2012 00:00

30_featureDesign is fickle, primarily because it is such a subjective process. Although there are solid principles of design, these rules are often broken. And that can letad to both innovative and disastrous results. The single biggest factor I’ve learned through the process of understanding design is that it’s fluid or organic. Good design is not static. Once a design becomes entrenched in a method or pattern, it starts on the path of inspirational decline. This doesn’t necessarily make it a bad design, just one that has matured and is no longer growing.

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