Irwin Tools focuses on trade contributions

irwinTo acknowledge the contributions of trade professionals, Irwin Tools initiated National Tradesmen Day in 2011. This year, Irwin launched a multimillion-dollar campaign aimed at raising national awareness leading up to the Sept. 20 event.

National Tradesmen Day is an opportunity for Americans to consider the contributions skilled tradesmen make to others’ lives, Irwin director of brand marketing Cheryl Mehrmann says.

“Some of the driving force behind launching this program is that it is part of the foundation of Irwin, which is working closely with end users to develop the unmet needs of trade professionals. This brings recognition to hands-on skilled trades, such as woodworking, that need to be highly recognized and regarded. That is not always the case in a world where most young people are getting pushed to obtain a four-year college education after high school,” says Mehrmann.

She adds that this is the company’s first national approach to recognizing the way tradesman of all aspects affect the lives of others.

“It’s time we thank them for it. Irwin Tools wants America to say thanks to these hard-working men and women who rarely receive the recognition they deserve. Young people have noticed that manual labor is devalued in our culture and because of that stigma, in part, they no longer consider a career in the trades.”

While new housing starts in April surged to a five-year high, according to the Commerce Department, she points out a troubling trend that only one skilled worker is entering the workforce for every three who are retiring or leaving these professions.

The campaign involved Irwin associates and its retail partners traveling around to various jobsites to thank tradesmen across the country. This included providing free product and other gifts from Irwin as a token of appreciation. One such event took place at One World Trade Center in New York City. 

For information, visit www.irwin.com and www.nationaltradesmenday.com.

This article originally appeared in the October 2013 issue.

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